Using photonic cooling systems to improve the efficiency of photovoltaic cells and their means of electricity production

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Alice Gordon
Ben Cross
Oliver Evans

Abstract

Photovoltaic (PV) systems generate electricity from the abundance of solar energy provided by the sun, making them a significant technology in utilising clean, renewable energy. It is in our best interest to achieve the maximum possible electrical output from these systems.
Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems are a effective technology to resource clean energy, it is in our best interest to achieve the maximum possible electrical output from these cells.
Through this meta-study we discuss how the efficiency of photovoltaic systems can be optimised using photonic cooling systems (PCS). The use of laser and doppler cooling upon photovoltaic (solar) cells combat the thermodynamic property of semiconductors where increases in temperature result in a decrease in electroconductive efficiency. PCS’ ability to bring materials to the mK range theoretically improves PV systems efficiency by more than double the current practical results. However, we show the inability for semiconductors to function at such low temperatures resulting in such cells acting as insulators in the mK range. Through this meta-study we have researched efficiency of PV cells and PCS through multiple paper analysis. Using databases such as Scopus and Nature where we recognise highly cited journals/papers while focusing upon PV and PCS as search parameters. Linking between their temperature, efficiency and success during practical testing.

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