Believing in bith - choosing VBAC: the childbirth expectations of a self-selected cohort of Australian women

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dc.contributor.author Fenwick, Jennifer en_US
dc.contributor.author Gamble, Jennifer en_US
dc.contributor.author Hauck, Yvonne en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-28T09:51:34Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-28T09:51:34Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier 2008006780 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Fenwick Jennifer, Gamble Jennifer, and Hauck Yvonne 2007, 'Believing in bith - choosing VBAC: the childbirth expectations of a self-selected cohort of Australian women', Blackwell Publishing Ltd, vol. 16, pp. 1561-1570. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0962-1067 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/9741
dc.description.abstract Aim. This study explored the childbirth expectations and knowledge of women who had experienced a caesarean and would prefer a vaginal birth in a subsequent pregnancy. Background. Vaginal birth after caesarean is considered best practice. However, in most western world countries, despite the inherent risks of caesarean for both mother and baby, the number of women labouring after a previous caesarean is declining. Methods. Newspaper advertisements were used to recruit Western Australian women who had experienced a caesarean. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the interview data collected from women who attempted a vaginal birth ( n = 24), or stated they would choose this option, in a subsequent pregnancy ( n = 11). Findings. For this cohort of women, their caesarean experience reinforced their previously held expectations about birthing naturally. The women held strong views about the importance of working with their bodies to achieve a vaginal birth, which was considered an integral part of being a woman and mother. Positive support from family and friends and a reluctance to undergo another caesarean was also influential. Women articulated the risks of caesarean and considered vaginal birth enhanced the health and well-being of the mother and baby, promoted maternal infant connection and the eased the transition to motherhood. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2006.01747.x en_US
dc.title Believing in bith - choosing VBAC: the childbirth expectations of a self-selected cohort of Australian women en_US
dc.parent Journal Of Clinical Nursing en_US
dc.journal.volume 16 en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation Oxford, UK en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 1561 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 1570 en_US
dc.cauo.name Midwifery, Child and Family Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 111006 en_US
dc.personcode 044296 en_US
dc.personcode 0000052018 en_US
dc.personcode 0000052061 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Midwifery en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords NA en_US


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