Leaf cooling curves: measuring leaf temperatures in sunlight

UTSePress Research/Manakin Repository

Search UTSePress Research


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Leigh, Andrea en_US
dc.contributor.author Close, John en_US
dc.contributor.author Ball, Marilyn en_US
dc.contributor.author Siebke, Katharina en_US
dc.contributor.author Nicotra, Adrienne en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-28T09:44:47Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-28T09:44:47Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.identifier 2008000873 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Leigh Andrea et al. 2006, 'Leaf cooling curves: measuring leaf temperatures in sunlight', CSIRO, vol. 33, pp. 515-519. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1445-4408 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/8677
dc.description.abstract Despite the obvious benefits of using thermography under field conditions, most infrared studies at the leaf level are generally conducted in the laboratory. One reason for this bias is that accuracy can potentially be compromised in sunlight because reflected radiation from the leaf might affect the calculation of the temperature measurement. We have developed a method for measuring leaf temperature in sunlight by using thermal imagery to generate cooling curves from which the time constant for cooling, ?, can be calculated. The original temperature of the sunlit leaf may be determined by extrapolating backwards in time. In the absence of specular reflection, there is close agreement between the extrapolated sunlit temperature and the sunlit temperature recorded by the camera. However, when reflected radiation is high, the difference between the initial (incorrect) temperature determined from the sunlit image and the temperature extrapolated from the cooling curve can be > 2?C. Notably, our results demonstrate a close agreement between the extrapolated sunlit temperature and the temperature of the leaf approximately 1 s after being shaded, suggesting that this shaded image provides a good estimate of the original sunlit temperature. Thus, our technique provides two means for measuring leaf surface temperature in sunlight en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher CSIRO en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/FP05300 en_US
dc.title Leaf cooling curves: measuring leaf temperatures in sunlight en_US
dc.parent Functional Plant Biology en_US
dc.journal.volume 33 en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.journal.number 5 en_US
dc.publocation Collingwood, Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 515 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 519 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Environmental Sciences en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 060200 en_US
dc.personcode 102196 en_US
dc.personcode 0000047356 en_US
dc.personcode 0000047357 en_US
dc.personcode 0000047358 en_US
dc.personcode 0000023499 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Plant Biology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords infrared imaging, reflected radiation, specular reflection, thermography, time constant en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record