The unusual antibacterial activity of medical-grade Leptospermum honey: antibacterial spectrum, resistance and transcriptome analysis

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dc.contributor.author Blair, Se en_US
dc.contributor.author Cokcetin, Nn en_US
dc.contributor.author Carter, David en_US
dc.contributor.author Harry, Liz en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-28T09:44:26Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-28T09:44:26Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier 2008007761 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Blair Se et al. 2009, 'The unusual antibacterial activity of medical-grade Leptospermum honey: antibacterial spectrum, resistance and transcriptome analysis', Springer, vol. 28, no. 10, pp. 1199-1208. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0934-9723 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/8614
dc.description.abstract There is an urgent need for new, effective agents in topical wound care, and selected honeys show potential in this regard. Using a medical-grade honey, eight species of problematic wound pathogens, including those with high levels of innate or acquired antibiotic resistance, were killed by 4.0-14.8% honey, which is a concentration that can be maintained in the wound environment. Resistance to honey could not be induced under conditions that rapidly induced resistance to antibiotics. Escherichia coli macroarrays were used to determine the response of bacterial cells to a sub-lethal dose of honey. The pattern of gene expression differed to that reported for other antimicrobial agents, indicating that honey acts in a unique and multifactorial way; 78 (2%) genes were upregulated and 46 (1%) genes were downregulated more than two-fold upon exposure to the medical-grade honey. Most of the upregulated genes clustered into distinct functional regulatory groups, with many involved in stress responses, and the majority of downregulated genes encoded for products involved in protein synthesis. Taken together, these data indicate that honey is an effective topical antimicrobial agent that could help reduce some of the current pressures that are promoting antibiotic resistance. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Springer en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10096-009-0763-z en_US
dc.title The unusual antibacterial activity of medical-grade Leptospermum honey: antibacterial spectrum, resistance and transcriptome analysis en_US
dc.parent European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infecti... en_US
dc.journal.volume 28 en_US
dc.journal.number 10 en_US
dc.publocation New York en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 1199 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 1208 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Faculty of Science en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 060500 en_US
dc.personcode 0000052797 en_US
dc.personcode 0000052798 en_US
dc.personcode 995003 en_US
dc.personcode 0000025242 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Microbiology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity ISI:000270430600005 en_US
dc.description.keywords NA en_US


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