Relationship Between Remotely-sensed Vegetation Indices, Canopy Attributes and Plant Physiological Processes: What Vegetation Indices Can and Cannot Tell Us About the Landscape

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dc.contributor.author Glenn, Edward en_US
dc.contributor.author Huete, Alfredo en_US
dc.contributor.author Nagler, Pamela en_US
dc.contributor.author Nelson, Stephen en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-28T09:43:09Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-28T09:43:09Z
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.identifier 2009001555 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Glenn Edward et al. 2008, 'Relationship Between Remotely-sensed Vegetation Indices, Canopy Attributes and Plant Physiological Processes: What Vegetation Indices Can and Cannot Tell Us About the Landscape', Molecular Diversity Preservation International (M DP I), vol. 8, pp. 2136-2160. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1424-8220 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/8424
dc.description.abstract Vegetation indices (VIs) are among the oldest tools in remote sensing studies. Although many variations exist, most of them ratio the reflection of light in the red and NIR sections of the spectrum to separate the landscape into water, soil, and vegetation. Theoretical analyses and field studies have shown that VIs are near-linearly related to photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by a plant canopy, and therefore to light-dependent physiological processes, such as photosynthesis, occurring in the upper canopy. Practical studies have used time-series VIs to measure primary production and evapotranspiration, but these are limited in accuracy to that of the data used in ground truthing or calibrating the models used. VIs are also used to estimate a wide variety of other canopy attributes that are used in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT), Surface Energy Balance (SEB), and Global Climate Models (GCM). These attributes include fractional vegetation cover, leaf area index, roughness lengths for turbulent transfer, emissivity and albedo. However, VIs often exhibit only moderate, non-linear relationships to these canopy attributes, compromising the accuracy of the models. We use case studies to illustrate the use and misuse of VIs, and argue for using VIs most simply as a measurement of canopy light absorption rather than as a surrogate for detailed features of canopy architecture. Used this way, VIs are compatible with "Big Leaf" SVAT and GCMs that assume that canopy carbon and moisture fluxes have the same relative response to the environment as any single leaf, simplifying the task of modeling complex landscapes. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Molecular Diversity Preservation International (M DP I) en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/s8042136 en_US
dc.title Relationship Between Remotely-sensed Vegetation Indices, Canopy Attributes and Plant Physiological Processes: What Vegetation Indices Can and Cannot Tell Us About the Landscape en_US
dc.parent Sensors en_US
dc.journal.volume 8 en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.journal.number 4 en_US
dc.publocation Switzerland en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 2136 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 2160 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Faculty of Science en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 030100 en_US
dc.personcode 0000054081 en_US
dc.personcode 108636 en_US
dc.personcode 0000054080 en_US
dc.personcode 0000059096 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Analytical Chemistry en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords Remote Sensing; NDVI; EVI; Evapotranspiration; Primary Production en_US


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