Managing adolescents who relapse following treatment for stuttering

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dc.contributor.author Hancock, K. en_US
dc.contributor.author Cobbin, D. M en_US
dc.contributor.author Craig, A. R en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-12-21T02:39:52Z
dc.date.available 2009-12-21T02:39:52Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_US
dc.identifier 2004002975 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Craig, A., Hancock, K., and Cobbin, D. 2005 'Managing adolescents who relapse following treatment for stuttering', Asia Pacific Journal of Speech Language and Hearing, vol. 7 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1361-3286 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/5606
dc.description.abstract Preventing relapse following treatment for stuttering remains a clinical priority. This paper introduces a relapse management programme offered to six adolescents who had improved their fluency immediately following treatment but who had relapsed in the long-term. This paper details the effectiveness of this programme. Relapse was based on the six subjects' stuttering frequency after at least two years following their original treatment. Their stuttering frequency had increased substantially in comparison with immediately after their original treatment, and was at least 5% syllables stuttered (%SS) in conversation, on the telephone and at home. Outcomes for these subjects were collected longitudinally up to two years after they received the relapse management programme. Efficacy of the relapse management programme was based on whether subjects were stuttering less than two years after the relapse programme in the three speech contexts in comparison with their performance following their original treatment. After two years, results showed a reoccurrence of relapse did not occur for four of the six adolescents. These four were speaking fluently and naturally at normal speech rates with minimal stuttering two years after the relapse management programme. Two subjects improved their fluency in the short term, but deteriorated once again in the long term. There was no clear trend for relapse to be related to increased levels of anxiety, though there was a trend for relapse to be associated with abnormal negative communication attitudes. en_US
dc.publisher University Sheffield Department Information Studies en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon en_US
dc.title Managing adolescents who relapse following treatment for stuttering en_US
dc.parent Asia Pacific Journal of Speech Language and Hearing en_US
dc.journal.volume 7 en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation Sheffield, UK en_US
dc.identifier.startpage en_US
dc.identifier.endpage en_US
dc.cauo.name Humanities and Social Science en_US


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