Listening Through the Firewall: Semiotics of sound in networked improvisation

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dc.contributor.author Mills, Roger en_US
dc.contributor.author Beilharz, Kirsty en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2014-04-03T01:08:39Z
dc.date.available 2014-04-03T01:08:39Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier 2011002206 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Mills, Roger and Beilharz, Kirsty 2012, 'Listening Through the Firewall: Semiotics of sound in networked improvisation', Organised Sound, vol. 17, no. 01, pp. 16-27. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1355-7718 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/22743
dc.description.abstract Maturation of network technologies and high-speed broadband has led to significant developments in multi-user platforms that enable synchronous networked improvisation across global distances. However sophisticated the interface, nuances of face-to-face communication such as gesture, facial expression, and body language are not available to the remote improviser. Sound artists and musicians must rely on listening and the semiotics of sound to mediate their interaction and the resulting collaboration. This paper examines two case studies of networked improvisatory performances by the inter-cultural tele-music ensemble Ethernet Orchestra.It focuses on qualities of sound (e.g. timbre, frequency, amplitude) in the group's networked improvisation, examining how they become arbiters of meaning in dialogical musical interactions without visual gestural signifiers. The evaluation is achieved through a framework of Distributed Cognition, highlighting the centrality of culture, artefact and environment in the analysis of dispersed musical perception. It contrasts salient qualities of sound in the groups? collective improvisation, highlighting the interpretive challenges for cross-cultural musicians in a real-time `jam? session. As network technologies provide unprecedented opportunities for diverse inter-cultural collaboration, it is sound as the carrier of meaning that mediates these new experiences. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Cambidge University Press en_US
dc.title Listening Through the Firewall: Semiotics of sound in networked improvisation en_US
dc.parent Organised Sound en_US
dc.journal.volume 17 en_US
dc.journal.number 01 en_US
dc.publocation UK en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 16 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 27 en_US
dc.cauo.name DAB.School of Design en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 190400 en_US
dc.personcode 10744148 en_US
dc.personcode 998722 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Performing Arts and Creative Writing en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords networked improvisation, tele-improvisation, semiotics, music, cross-cultural Maturation of network technologies and high-speed broadband has led to significant developments in multi-user platforms that enable synchronous networked improvisation across global distances. However sophisticated the interface, nuances of face-to-face communication such as gesture, facial expression, and body language are not available to the remote improviser. Sound artists and musicians must rely on listening and the semiotics of sound to mediate their interaction and the resulting collaboration. This paper examines two case studies of networked improvisatory performances by the inter-cultural tele-music ensemble Ethernet Orchestra.It focuses on qualities of sound (e.g. timbre, frequency, amplitude) in the group's networked improvisation, examining how they become arbiters of meaning in dialogical musical interactions without visual gestural signifiers. The evaluation is achieved through a framework of Distributed Cognition, highlighting the centrality of culture, artefact and environment in the analysis of dispersed musical perception. It contrasts salient qualities of sound in the groupsa?? collective improvisation, highlighting the interpretive challenges for cross-cultural musicians in a real-time a??jama?? session. As network technologies provide unprecedented opportunities for diverse inter-cultural collaboration, it is sound as the carrier of meaning that mediates these new experiences. en_US
dc.staffid 998722 en_US


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