Ambiguities of Transnational Identities: Divergent Convergence and Convergent Divergence between Ethnicising and Cosmopolitanism

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dc.contributor.author Pries, Ludger
dc.date.accessioned 2009-11-19T23:56:07Z
dc.date.accessioned 2012-12-15T03:12:46Z
dc.date.available 2009-11-19T23:56:07Z
dc.date.available 2012-12-15T03:12:46Z
dc.date.issued 2009-03-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2100/937
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/19872
dc.description Audio recording. Running time 57 minutes 33 seconds. Original held UTS Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Centre, Level 3, 645 Harris Street Sydney en
dc.description.abstract The concept of identity as the awareness of the Self and the Other implicates the notion of a more or less explicitly perceived and felt perception of continuity in time and homogeneity in space. As the two aspects of personal and of social identity are inextricably interconnected, identity as a societal and as a scientific concept is an outcome of the ideas of humanism and of the process of modernisation. In the era of reflexive modernisation the idea of identity is challenged in social practice as well as in social sciences. Notions like multiple, transitory or hybrid identity and identity as ‘politics if belonging’ indicate their multiple levels, their dynamics in time, their heterogeneity in space, as well as their incoherence in spite of homogeneity, their discourse character, and their relation to interests and negotiations. In this general context, the paper focuses on two related specific aspects of identity: the process of transnationalisation of identities and the relation of identities to the frame of reference of humanism. It is argued (1) that transnational identities always existed as marginal phenomena but now become a general feature, and (2) that this leads neither to a segmented ethnicising nor to a generalised simple humanism as cosmopolitism. These main arguments are developed proposing different types of humanisms and the notion of divergent convergence and convergent divergence using the example of citizenship. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher UTS Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Centre
dc.relation.ispartofseries Public Lecture 2009
dc.subject society en
dc.subject civil en
dc.subject ethnicity en
dc.subject identity en
dc.subject cosmopolitan en
dc.subject transnational en
dc.title Ambiguities of Transnational Identities: Divergent Convergence and Convergent Divergence between Ethnicising and Cosmopolitanism en
dc.type Recording, oral en


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