Green nanotechnology

UTSePress Research/Manakin Repository

Search UTSePress Research


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Smith, Geoff en_US
dc.contributor.editor Raul J. Martin-Palma; Yi-Jun Jen; Tom G. Mackay en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-12T03:37:52Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-12T03:37:52Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier 2011002044 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Smith Geoffrey 2011, 'Green nanotechnology', Proceedings of SPIE, The International Society for Optics and Photonics, United States en_US
dc.identifier.issn 9780819487148 en_US
dc.identifier.other E5 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/19436
dc.description.abstract Nanotechnology, in particular nanophotonics, is proving essential to achieving green outcomes of sustainability and renewable energy at the scales needed. Coatings, composites and polymeric structures used in windows, roof and wall coatings, energy storage, insulation and other components in energy efficient buildings will increasingly involve nanostructure, as will solar cells. Nanostructures have the potential to revolutionize thermoelectric power and may one day provide efficient refrigerant free cooling. Nanomaterials enable optimization of optical, opto-electrical and thermal responses to this urgent task. Optical harmonization of material responses to environmental energy flows involves (i) large changes in spectral response over limited wavelength bands (ii) tailoring to environmental dynamics. The latter includes engineering angle of incidence dependencies and switchable (or chromogenic) responses. Nanomaterials can be made at sufficient scale and low enough cost to be both economic and to have a high impact on a short time scale. Issues to be addressed include human safety and property changes induced during manufacture, handling and outdoor use. Unexpected bonuses have arisen in this work, for example the savings and environmental benefits of cool roofs extend beyond the more obvious benefit of reduced heat flows from the roof into the building. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher The International Society for Optics and Photonics en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.893114 en_US
dc.title Green nanotechnology en_US
dc.parent Proceedings of SPIE en_US
dc.journal.volume en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation United States en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 14 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Faculty of Science en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 100701 en_US
dc.personcode 730312 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Environmental Nanotechnology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom Nanostructured Thin Films IV en_US
dc.date.activity 20110823 en_US
dc.location.activity San Diego, California, USA en_US
dc.description.keywords energy efficiency, windows, cool roofs, paints, nano-coatings, spectral selectivity, angular selectivity, chromogenics en_US
dc.staffid en_US
dc.staffid 730312 en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record