Self-efficacy: a useful construct to promote physical activity in people with stable chronic heart failure

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dc.contributor.author Du, Hui Yun en_US
dc.contributor.author Everett, Bronwyn en_US
dc.contributor.author Newton, Phillip en_US
dc.contributor.author Salamonson, Yenna en_US
dc.contributor.author Davidson, Patricia en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-12T03:34:33Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-12T03:34:33Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier 2011004249 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Du Hui Yun et al. 2012, 'Self-efficacy: a useful construct to promote physical activity in people with stable chronic heart failure', Blackwell Publishing Ltd, vol. 21, pp. 301-310. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0962-1067 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/18708
dc.description.abstract Aim. To explore the conceptual underpinnings of self-efficacy to address the barriers to participating in physical activity and propose a model of intervention. Background. The benefits of physical activity in reducing cardiovascular risk have led to evidence-based recommendations for patients with heart disease, including those with chronic heart failure. However, adherence to best practice recommendations is often suboptimal, particularly in those individuals who experience high symptom burden and feel less confident to undertake physical activity. Self-efficacy is the degree of confidence an individual has in his/her ability to perform behaviour under several specific circumstances. Four factors influence an individuala??s level of self-efficacy: (1) past performance, (2) vicarious experience, (3) verbal persuasion and (4) physiological arousal. Design. Discursive. Methods. Using the method of a discursive paper, this article seeks to explore the conceptual underpinnings of self-efficacy to address the barriers to participating in physical activity and proposes a model of intervention, the Home-Heart-Walk, to promote physical activity and monitor functional status. Conclusions. Implementing effective interventions to promote physical activities require appreciation of factors impacting on behaviour change. Addressing concepts relating to self-efficacy in physical activity interventions may promote participation and adherence in the longer term. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03983.x en_US
dc.title Self-efficacy: a useful construct to promote physical activity in people with stable chronic heart failure en_US
dc.parent Journal Of Clinical Nursing en_US
dc.journal.volume 21 en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation Oxford, UK en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 301 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 310 en_US
dc.cauo.name FOH.Faculty of Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 111000 en_US
dc.personcode 0000066046 en_US
dc.personcode 107686 en_US
dc.personcode 111808 en_US
dc.personcode 0000027623 en_US
dc.personcode 110950 en_US
dc.percentage 50 en_US
dc.classification.name Nursing en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords chronic heart failure, nurses, nursing, physical activity, self-efficacy, theoretical framework en_US
dc.staffid 110950 en_US


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