Who listens to our advice? A secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial testing an intervention designed to decrease delay in seeking treatment for acute coronary syndrome

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dc.contributor.author Riegel, Barbara en_US
dc.contributor.author Elmi, Angelo en_US
dc.contributor.author Moser, Debra en_US
dc.contributor.author Mckinley, Sharon en_US
dc.contributor.author Meischke, Hendrika en_US
dc.contributor.author Doering, Lynn en_US
dc.contributor.author Davidson, Patricia en_US
dc.contributor.author Pelter, Michelle en_US
dc.contributor.author Baker, Heather en_US
dc.contributor.author Dracup, Kathleen en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-12T03:34:27Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-12T03:34:27Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier 2011000873 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Riegel Barbara et al. 2011, 'Who listens to our advice? A secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial testing an intervention designed to decrease delay in seeking treatment for acute coronary syndrome', Elsevier Ireland, vol. 85, pp. 33-38. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0738-3991 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/18633
dc.description.abstract Objective: Prolonged prehospital delay in persons experiencing acute coronary syndrome (ACS) remains a problem. Understanding which patients respond best to particular interventions designed to decrease delay time would provide mechanistic insights into the process by which interventions work. Methods: In the PROMOTION trial, 3522 at-risk patients were enrolled from 5 sites in the United States (56.4%), Australia and New Zealand; 490 (N = 272 intervention, N = 218 control) had an acute event within 2 years. Focusing on these 490, we (1) identified predictors of a rapid response to symptoms, (2) identified intervention group subjects with a change in these predictors over 3 months of follow-up, and (3) compared intervention group participants with and without the favorable response pattern. Hypothesized predictors of rapid response were increased perceived control and decreased anxiety. Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs were hypothesized to differ between responders and non-responders. Results: Contrary to hypothesis, responders had low anxiety and low perceived control. Only 73 (26.8%) subjects showed this pattern 3 months following the intervention. No differences in ACS knowledge, attitudes, or beliefs were found. Conclusion: The results of this study challenge existing beliefs. Practice implications: New intervention approaches that focus on a realistic decrease in anxiety and perceived control are needed. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier Ireland en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2010.07.043 en_US
dc.title Who listens to our advice? A secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial testing an intervention designed to decrease delay in seeking treatment for acute coronary syndrome en_US
dc.parent Patient Education And Counseling en_US
dc.journal.volume 85 en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation Ireland en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 33 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 38 en_US
dc.cauo.name FOH.Faculty of Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 111000 en_US
dc.personcode 0000035326 en_US
dc.personcode 0000073155 en_US
dc.personcode 105630 en_US
dc.personcode 930003 en_US
dc.personcode 0000054604 en_US
dc.personcode 0000035328 en_US
dc.personcode 110950 en_US
dc.personcode 0000034424 en_US
dc.personcode 0000054679 en_US
dc.personcode 106354 en_US
dc.percentage 25 en_US
dc.classification.name Nursing en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords Acute coronary syndrome, Treatment seeking delay, Denial, Common sense model, Responder analysis en_US
dc.staffid 106354 en_US


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