Habitat alteration and community-level effects of an invasive ecosystem engineer: a case study along the coast of NSW, Australia

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dc.contributor.author Gallucci, Fabiane en_US
dc.contributor.author Hutchings, Pat en_US
dc.contributor.author Gribben, Paul en_US
dc.contributor.author Fonseca, Gustavo en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-12T03:33:31Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-12T03:33:31Z
dc.date.issued 2012 en_US
dc.identifier 2011002219 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Gallucci Fabiane et al. 2012, 'Habitat alteration and community-level effects of an invasive ecosystem engineer: a case study along the coast of NSW, Australia', Inter Research, vol. 449, pp. 95-U120. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0171-8630 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/18185
dc.description.abstract We investigated the effects of the habitat-modifying green algae Caulerpa taxifolia on meiobenthic communities along the coast of New South Wales, Australia. Samples were taken from unvegetated sediments, sediments underneath the native seagrass Zostera capricorni, and sediments invaded by C. taxifolia at 3 sites along the coast. Meiofaunal responses to invasion varied in type and magnitude depending on the site, ranging from a slight increase to a substantial reduction in meiofauna and nematode abundances and diversity. The multivariate structure of meiofauna communities and nematode assemblages, in particular, differed significantly in sediments invaded by C. taxifolia when compared to native habitats, but the magnitude of this dissimilarity differed between the sites. These differential responses of meiofauna to C. taxifolia were explained by different sediment redox potentials. Sediments with low redox potential showed significantly lower fauna abundances, lower numbers of meiofaunal taxa and nematode species and more distinct assemblages. The response of meiofauna to C. taxifolia also depended on spatial scale. Whereas significant loss of benthic biodiversity was observed locally at one of the sites, at the larger scale C. taxifolia promoted an overall increase in nematode species richness by favouring species that were absent from the native environments. Finally, we suggest there might be some time-lags associated with the impacts of C. taxifolia and point to the importance of considering the time since invasion when evaluating the impact of invasive species. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Inter Research en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps09547 en_US
dc.title Habitat alteration and community-level effects of an invasive ecosystem engineer: a case study along the coast of NSW, Australia en_US
dc.parent Marine Ecology Progress Series en_US
dc.journal.volume 449 en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation Germany en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 95 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage U120 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Environmental Sciences en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 060200 en_US
dc.personcode 0000074126 en_US
dc.personcode 0000023999 en_US
dc.personcode 101424 en_US
dc.personcode 0000074127 en_US
dc.percentage 34 en_US
dc.classification.name Ecology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords Ecosystem engineer; Invasive species; Meiofauna; Nematodes; Caulerpa taxifolia; ALGA CAULERPA-TAXIFOLIA; INTRODUCED GREEN-ALGA; BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS; MUSCULISTA-SENHOUSIA; ZOSTERA-CAPRICORNI; NEMATODE COMMUNITY; EXOTIC MUSSEL; NATIVE FAUNA; SEDIMENTS; SEAGRASS en_US


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