Do Respondents' Perceptions of the Status Quo Matter in Non-Market Valuation with Choice Experiments? An Application to New Zealand Freshwater Streams

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dc.contributor.author Scarpa, Riccardo en_US
dc.contributor.author Marsh, Dan en_US
dc.contributor.author Mkwara, L en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-12T03:33:19Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-12T03:33:19Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier 2011001943 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Scarpa Riccardo, Marsh Dan, and Mkwara L 2011, 'Do Respondents' Perceptions of the Status Quo Matter in Non-Market Valuation with Choice Experiments? An Application to New Zealand Freshwater Streams', MDPI Publishing, vol. 3, no. 9, pp. 1593-1615. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 2071-1050 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/18106
dc.description.abstract Many issues relating to the sustainability of environmental resource use are informed by environmental valuation studies with stated preference surveys. Within these, researchers often provide descriptions of status quo conditions which may differ from those perceived by respondents. Ignoring this difference in utility baselines may affect the magnitude of estimated utility changes and hence bias benefit estimates of proposed environmental policies. We investigate this issue using data from a choice experiment on a community?s willingness to pay for water quality improvements in streams. More than 60% of respondents perceived streams? water quality at the status quo to be better than the description we provided in our scenario. Results show that respondents who could provide details of their perception of the status quo displayed stronger preferences for water quality improvements?and hence higher marginal willingness to pay?than their counterparts. However, respondents who referred to their own status quo description displayed a higher inclination to prefer the status quo, while other respondents tended to prefer the proposed improvements. We argue this might be linked to the amount of knowledge each group displayed about the status quo: a kind of reluctance to leave what one believes he/she knows well. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher MDPI Publishing en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/su3091593 en_US
dc.title Do Respondents' Perceptions of the Status Quo Matter in Non-Market Valuation with Choice Experiments? An Application to New Zealand Freshwater Streams en_US
dc.parent Sustainability en_US
dc.journal.volume 3 en_US
dc.journal.number 9 en_US
dc.publocation Basel, Switzerland en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 1593 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 1615 en_US
dc.cauo.name BUS.Centre for the Study of Choice en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 050200 en_US
dc.personcode 107632 en_US
dc.personcode 0000073197 en_US
dc.personcode 0000073984 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Environmental Science and Management en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords NA en_US
dc.staffid en_US


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