Plant species of the Central European flora as aliens in Australia

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dc.contributor.author Phillips Megan en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-12T03:33:18Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-12T03:33:18Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier 2010006038 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Phillips Megan 2010, 'Plant species of the Central European flora as aliens in Australia', Czech Botanical Society, vol. 82, no. 4, pp. 465-482. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0032-7786 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/18097
dc.description.abstract The Central European flora is an important source pool of plant species introduced to many regions throughout the world. In this study, we identified a total of 759 plant species of the Central European flora that are currently recognized as alien species in Australia. We explored temporal patterns of introduction of these species to Australia in relation to method of introduction, growth form, naturalization status and taxonomy. Across all species, substantially larger numbers of species were introduced between 1840 and 1880 as well as between 1980 and the present, with a small peak of introductions within the 1930s. These patterns reflect early immigration patterns to Australia, recent improvements in fast and efficient transportation around the globe, and emigration away from difficult conditions brought about by the lead up to the Second World War respectively. We found that the majority of species had deliberate (69%) rather than accidental (31%) introductions and most species have not naturalized (66% casual species, 34% naturalized species). A total of 86 plant families comprising 31 tree species, 91 shrub species, 533 herbaceous species and 61 grass species present in Central Europe have been introduced to Australia. Differential patterns of temporal introduction of species were found as a function of both plant family and growth form and these patterns appear linked to variation in human migration numbers to Australia. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Czech Botanical Society en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon en_US
dc.title Plant species of the Central European flora as aliens in Australia en_US
dc.parent Preslia en_US
dc.journal.volume 82 en_US
dc.journal.number 4 en_US
dc.publocation Czech Republic en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 465 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 482 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Environmental Sciences en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 050103 en_US
dc.personcode 101392 en_US
dc.percentage 000100 en_US
dc.classification.name Invasive Species Ecology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords alien plants; Australia; Central Europe; growth form; introduction history; naturalization; residence time; source-pool approach en_US
dc.staffid en_US


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