Nursing Care Practices Following a Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Results of a Survey of Australian and New Zealand Cardiovascular Nurses

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dc.contributor.author Rolley, John en_US
dc.contributor.author Salamonson, Yenna en_US
dc.contributor.author Dennison, Cheryl en_US
dc.contributor.author Davidson, Patricia en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-10T06:09:47Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-10T06:09:47Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier 2010004479 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Rolley John et al. 2010, 'Nursing Care Practices Following a Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Results of a Survey of Australian and New Zealand Cardiovascular Nurses', Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 75-84. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0889-4655 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/17134
dc.description.abstract Although there is high-level evidence to guide optimal medical care for percutaneous coronary interventions, there are less explicit guidelines to support nurses in providing care. Aim: This study describes the practice standards and priorities of care of cardiovascular nurses in Australia and New Zealand. Method: Item generation for the survey was informed by an integrative literature review and existing clinical guidelines. A 116-item Web-based survey was administered to cardiovascular nurses, via electronic mail lists of professional cardiovascular nursing organizations, using a secure online data collection system. Results: Data were collected from March 2008 to March 2009. A total of 148 respondents attempted the survey, with 110 (74.3%) completing all items. All respondents were registered nurses with an average of 12.3 (SD, 7.61) years of clinical experience in the cardiovascular setting. A range of practice patterns was evident in ambulation time after percutaneous coronary intervention, methods of sheath removal, pain relief, and patient positioning. Respondents consistently rated psychosocial care a lower priority than other tasks and also identified a knowledge deficit in this area. Conclusion: This survey identified diversity of practice patterns and a range of educational needs. Increasing evidence to support evidence-based practice and guideline development is necessary to promote high-quality care and improved patient outcomes. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JCN.0b013e3181bb419d en_US
dc.title Nursing Care Practices Following a Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Results of a Survey of Australian and New Zealand Cardiovascular Nurses en_US
dc.parent Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing en_US
dc.journal.volume 25 en_US
dc.journal.number 1 en_US
dc.publocation United States en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 75 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 84 en_US
dc.cauo.name FOH.Faculty of Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 111000 en_US
dc.personcode 0000069603 en_US
dc.personcode 0000027623 en_US
dc.personcode 0000069689 en_US
dc.personcode 110950 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Nursing en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords angioplasty, clinical practice nursing research, questionnaires, standards, transluminal percutaneous coronar en_US
dc.staffid 110950 en_US


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