Light trapping in translucent samples and its effect on the hemispherical transmittance obtained by an integrating sphere

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dc.contributor.author Jonsson, Jacob en_US
dc.contributor.author Roos, Arne en_US
dc.contributor.author Smith, Geoff en_US
dc.contributor.editor Hanssen, LM en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-11-09T02:44:02Z
dc.date.available 2009-11-09T02:44:02Z
dc.date.issued 2003 en_US
dc.identifier 2003000989 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Jonsson Jacob, Roos Arne, and Smith Geoffrey 2003, 'Light trapping in translucent samples and its effect on the hemispherical transmittance obtained by an integrating sphere', International Society for Optical Engineering, Washington, USA, pp. 91-100. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0277-786X en_US
dc.identifier.other E1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/1701
dc.description.abstract When a beam of light is incident on a translucent sample, a significant fraction of the light is scattered at high angles. Some of this scattered light may be trapped inside the substrate through multiple reflections and total internal reflection, similar to light coupling into an optical fiber. The trapping depends on factors such as the surface roughness of the external surfaces and/or the size and distribution of scattering particles inside the sample. The scattered light may thus escape out of the sample at a shifted position relative to the incident beam. This leads to port losses in an integrating sphere. The detected signal from the light entering the sphere then underestimates the hemispherical transmittance. In this paper the signal versus lateral position has been measured in an attempt to estimate the error and to find an extrapolation procedure for the correct transmittance value. The lateral measurements were carried out by moving a detector behind the sample, a procedure carried out at several angles of incidence. Different illumination methods have also been studied both theoretically and experimentally to further investigate what effect light trapping can have when characterising scattering samples. en_US
dc.publisher International Society for Optical Engineering en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.508196 en_US
dc.rights © (2003) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
dc.title Light trapping in translucent samples and its effect on the hemispherical transmittance obtained by an integrating sphere en_US
dc.parent Proceedings of the SPIE. Optical Diagnostic Methods for Inorganic Meterials III en_US
dc.journal.volume en_US
dc.journal.number en_US
dc.publocation Washington, USA en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 91 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 100 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Physics and Advanced Materials en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.conference.location San Diego CA, USA en_US
dc.for 020500 en_US
dc.personcode 0000020327 en_US
dc.personcode 0000020668 en_US
dc.personcode 730312 en_US
dc.percentage 60 en_US
dc.classification.name Optical Physics en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.custom Optical Diagnostic Methods for Inorganic Materials III en_US
dc.date.activity 20030806 en_US
dc.location.activity San Diego CA, USA en_US
dc.description.keywords integrating spheres, light scaterring, optical trapping, hemispherical transmittanceWhen a beam of lishg is incident on a translucent sample, a significant fraction of the light is scattered at high angles. Some of this scattered light may be trapped inside the substrate through multiple reflections and total internal reflections, similar to light coupling into an optical fiber. The trapping depends on factors such as the surface roughness of the external surfaces and/or the size and distribution of scattering particles inside the sample. The scattered light may thus escape out of the sample at shifted position relative to the incident beam. This leads to port losses in an integrating sphere. The detected signal from the light entering the sphere then underestimates the hemispherical transmittance. In this paper the signal versus lateral position has been measured in an attempt to estimate the error and to find out by moving a detector behind the sample, a procedure carried out at several angles of incidence. Different illumination methods have also been studied both theoretically and experimentally to further investigate what effect light trapping can have when characterising scattering samples. en_US
dc.staffid 730312 en_US


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