Nursing research programs gather strength in Australia

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dc.contributor.author Borbasi, Sally en_US
dc.contributor.author Emden, Carolyn en_US
dc.contributor.author Jackson, Debra en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-02T11:00:53Z
dc.date.available 2012-02-02T11:00:53Z
dc.date.issued 2005 en_US
dc.identifier 2010003751 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Borbasi Sally, Emden Carolyn, and Jackson Debra 2005, 'Nursing research programs gather strength in Australia', Elsevier, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 7-10. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1322-7696 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1UNSUBMIT en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/15596
dc.description.abstract To shed light on programmatic research through direct experience is highly beneficial to nursing scholarship. Following a recent description of a successful Australian program of research centered around people's chronic illness experience we are inspired to continue the commentary (Koch et al 2005). Koch et ala??s (2005) case study reported on several 'core elements' they believe have contributed to the growth and effectiveness of their program. In this paper we consider some of these in light of current literature and our own challenging experiences within several Australian universities. Koch et al (2005) also makes a not too subtle distinction between dedicated research units independent of universities and research programs emanating from academia, suggesting the former are more productive. While one of the authors in the above paper, a UK scholar and nursing academic, makes interesting observations about this assertion, we contend that his UK perspective fails to capture the urgency of establishing nursing research programs in Australian universities. Consequently, we have chosen to extend the discussion about nursing research programs from the perspective of Australian academe, including comment on building productive relationships, strengthening a track record, research and practice as symbiotic processes, competitive funding strategies, and the integral role of research students. The entire commentary is located in a celebratory context of 20 years of Australian nursing education in the university sector, a context not without controversy.We give consideration to the best way ahead for the future of nursing research programs and hope our ideas spark further sharing of experiences. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.title Nursing research programs gather strength in Australia en_US
dc.parent Collegian en_US
dc.journal.volume 12 en_US
dc.journal.number 2 en_US
dc.publocation Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 7 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 10 en_US
dc.cauo.name FOH.Faculty of Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 111000 en_US
dc.personcode 0000068935 en_US
dc.personcode 0000068936 en_US
dc.personcode 112168 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Nursing en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords programmatic research, nursing research programs, academe, issues en_US
dc.staffid 112168 en_US


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