The impact of nurses on patient morbidity and mortality- the need for a policy change in response to the nursing shortage

UTSePress Research/Manakin Repository

Search UTSePress Research


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Twigg, Diane en_US
dc.contributor.author Duffield, Christine en_US
dc.contributor.author Thompson, Peter en_US
dc.contributor.author Rapley, Patricia en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-02-07T06:27:26Z
dc.date.available 2011-02-07T06:27:26Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier 2009001044 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Twigg Di et al. 2010, 'The impact of nurses on patient morbidity and mortality- the need for a policy change in response to the nursing shortage', Australian Healthcare Association, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 312-316. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0156-5788 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/14074
dc.description.abstract CONTEXT: Workforce projections indicate that by 2012 there will be a shortfall of 61,000 registered nurses in Australia. There is a growing body of evidence that links registered nurse staffing to better patient outcomes. PURPOSE: This article provides a comprehensive review of the research linking nurse staffing to patient outcomes at a time of growing shortages, highlighting that a policy response based on substituting registered nurses with lower skilled workers may have adverse effects on patient outcomes. METHOD: An electronic search of articles published in English using the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Journals @ OVID and Medline was undertaken. FINDINGS: Robust evidence exists nationally and internationally that links nurse staffing to patient outcomes. Recent meta-analyses have found that there was a 3-12% reduction in adverse outcomes and a 16% reduction in the risk of mortality in surgical patients with higher registered nurse staffing. Evidence confirms that improvements in nurse staffing is a cost-effective investment for the health system but this is not fully appreciated by health policy advisors. CONCLUSIONS: An appropriate policy response demands that the evidence that patient safety is linked to nurse staffing be recognised. Policy makers must ensure there are sufficient registered nurses to guarantee patient safety. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Australian Healthcare Association en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AH08668 en_US
dc.title The impact of nurses on patient morbidity and mortality- the need for a policy change in response to the nursing shortage en_US
dc.parent Australian Health Review en_US
dc.journal.volume 34 en_US
dc.journal.number 3 en_US
dc.publocation Canberra, Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 312 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 316 en_US
dc.cauo.name FOH.Faculty of Health en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 160500 en_US
dc.personcode 10247789 en_US
dc.personcode 840194 en_US
dc.personcode 0000058624 en_US
dc.personcode 0000027083 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Policy and Administration en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords NA en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record