The naturalization to invasion transition: Are there introduction-history correlates of invasiveness in exotic plants of Australia?

UTSePress Research/Manakin Repository

Search UTSePress Research


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Phillips, Megan en_US
dc.contributor.author Leishman, Michelle en_US
dc.contributor.author Ingram, Robert en_US
dc.contributor.author Murray, Brad en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-02-07T06:19:51Z
dc.date.available 2011-02-07T06:19:51Z
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier 2009007209 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Phillips Megan et al. 2010, 'The naturalization to invasion transition: Are there introduction-history correlates of invasiveness in exotic plants of Australia?', Blackwell Publishing Ltd, vol. 35, no. NA, pp. 695-703. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1442-9985 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/13219
dc.description.abstract Of the large number of exotic plant species that become naturalized in new geographic regions, only a subset make the transition to become invasive. Identifying the factors that underpin the transition from naturalization to invasion is important for our understanding of biological invasions. To determine introductionhistory correlates of invasiveness among naturalized plant species of Australia, we compared geographic origin, reason for introduction, minimum residence time and growth form between naturalized non-invasive species and naturalized invasive plant species. We found that more invasive species than expected originated from South America and North America, while fewer invasive species than expected originated from Europe and Australasia. There was no significant difference between invasive and non-invasive species with respect to reason for introduction to Australia. However, invasive species were significantly more likely to have been resident in Australia for a longer period of time than non-invasive species. Residence times of invasive species were consistently and significantly higher than residence times of non-invasive species even when each continent of origin was considered separately. Furthermore, residence times for both invasive and non-invasive species varied significantly as a function of continent of origin, with species from South America having been introduced to Australia more recently on average than species from Europe, Australasia and North America. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd en_US
dc.relation.isbasedon http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-9993.2009.02076.x en_US
dc.title The naturalization to invasion transition: Are there introduction-history correlates of invasiveness in exotic plants of Australia? en_US
dc.parent Austral Ecology en_US
dc.journal.volume 35 en_US
dc.journal.number 6 en_US
dc.publocation Australia en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 695 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 703 en_US
dc.cauo.name SCI.Faculty of Science en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 060200 en_US
dc.personcode 101392 en_US
dc.personcode 010046 en_US
dc.personcode 0000020599 en_US
dc.personcode 0000063605 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Ecology en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords alien, biological invasions, growth form, invasiveness, residence time en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record