The Physiognomy of Dispersed Power

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dc.contributor.author Marshall, Jonathan en_US
dc.contributor.editor en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-06-16T04:59:00Z
dc.date.available 2010-06-16T04:59:00Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier 2009000054 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Marshall Jonathan 2009, 'The Physiognomy of Dispersed Power', MIT Press, vol. 16, no. 4-5, pp. 1-21. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1071-4391 en_US
dc.identifier.other C1 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10453/11854
dc.description.abstract The web of post-modern power appears nomadic, elusive and always elsewhere. Like our online presences, it has no obvious boundaries and appears as spirit-like, a magic life haunting the net and the world. Government becomes liminal: 'Liminal identities are neither here nor there, they are betwixt and between the positions assigned by law, custom and ceremonial' to quote Victor Turner. This liminality has changed the balance of power between the corporate and non-corporate sectors, however this does not mean that power is straightforward. When everything is interlinked through information technology then exercises of power may even increase confusion and undermine the bases or legitimacy of that power. Modes of ordering can produce perceived disorder. Knowledge of the system becomes divination and trapped in magic. It is suggested that an awareness of this, and focusing on contradiction, or oscillation is more useful than focusing on simplicity. en_US
dc.language en_US
dc.publisher MIT Press en_US
dc.title The Physiognomy of Dispersed Power en_US
dc.parent Leonardo Eelectronic Almanac (LEA) en_US
dc.journal.volume 16 en_US
dc.journal.number 4-5 en_US
dc.publocation United States en_US
dc.identifier.startpage 1 en_US
dc.identifier.endpage 21 en_US
dc.cauo.name FASS.Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences en_US
dc.conference Verified OK en_US
dc.for 160806 en_US
dc.personcode 030171 en_US
dc.percentage 100 en_US
dc.classification.name Social Theory en_US
dc.classification.type FOR-08 en_US
dc.edition en_US
dc.custom en_US
dc.date.activity en_US
dc.location.activity en_US
dc.description.keywords Information society, power, divination, disorder en_US
dc.staffid en_US
dc.staffid 030171 en_US


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