Browsing by Author "Graham, Nicole"

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Browsing by Author "Graham, Nicole"

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  • Graham, Nicole (Australasian Law Teachers Association, 2009)
    Indigenous land laws, Indigenous perspectives on Anglo Australian property law and native title are often taught as optional or even irrelevant to real property in Australian law schools. Conventional pedagogical choices ...
  • Graham, Nicole (Routledge, 2011)
    In Lawscape Nicole Graham develops a rich, timely and (in more senses than one) radical critique of orthodox and critical perspectives on property. After reading this critiq ue, many theorists of property who imagine ...
  • Bartel, Robyn; Graham, Nicole; Jackson, Sue; Prior, Jason; Robinson, Daniel; Sherval, Meg; Williams, Stewart (Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia, 2013)
    Law is a powerful influence on people and place. Law both creates and is created by the relationship between people and place, although it rarely acknowledges this. Law frequently operates as if space does not matter. ...
  • Sherval, Meg; Graham, Nicole (Alternative Law Journal, 2013)
    The authors of this piece critique the recent land use planning reforms in NSW, particularly the Policy regarding Strategic Regional Land Use Plans (SRLUP). Taking the Upper Hunter SRLUP as an example, the authors contend ...
  • Graham, Nicole (Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2011)
    As collapses and crises involving ecological systems, economic and financial management and international governance increase, the need for bold alternatives to traditional economic and legal responses has never been more ...
  • Graham, Nicole (Wakefield Press, 2011)
    The Earth and jurisprudence are both systems. The Earth is a system of physical and interlinked relationships. Jurisprudence is a system of abstract laws. Jurisprudence is a human creation. As such, jurisprudence is a ...
  • Graham, Nicole (Hart Publishing, 2009)
    JEREMY BENTHAM REGARDED William Blackstone's work as a 'striking example of the inability of the common law to provide adequate definitions of property. He attributed this in part to the bifurcated categories of 'real' ...