Editorial

Jean Searle


Abstract

We are constantly being reminded by governments and the media that we now live in a globalised economy and in order to compete we need a highly educated workforce. In this context, literacy and numeracy skills are not only used as international benchmarks to record a nation’s
competitiveness and wellbeing, but these skills are also deemed to be fundamental to employment. A lack of, or inadequate literacy and numeracy, means to be marginalised, that is, barred from access to new forms of knowledge and new modes of thinking.

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References

Lave, J (1988) Cognition in Practice: Mind, mathematics and culture in everyday practice, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511609268

Organisation for Economic and Cultural Development and Statistics Canada (1996) International Survey of Adult Literacy, Organisation for Economic and Cultural Development Paris.

Prinsloo, M and Breier, M, eds (1996) The Social Uses of Literacy: Theory and practice in contemporary South Africa, Sached Books, Cape Town. http://dx.doi.org/10.1075/swll.4

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