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Locating Suburbia

memory, place, creativity
Edited by Paula Hamilton and Paul Ashton
2013
ISBN: 
978 1 86365 432 6
Locating suburbia: memory, place, creativity

The identity of suburbia, so far as it can be ascribed one, is shifting and insecure, a borderline and liminal space. Dominant stereotypes have listed it as ‘on the margins’ beyond edges of cultural sophistication and tradition’ and the areas that make up ‘sprawl’. But in the twenty-first century this static view has to be modified. As is evident from this collection, suburban dwellers themselves have redefined themselves. This collection explores the range and complexity of twenty-first century responses to city suburbs, predominantly in Sydney. It draws on a range of approaches – from history to creative non-fiction and multi-media.

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About the Editors: 

Paula Hamilton is Professor with the Creative Practices Group at the University of Technology, Sydney. Her research interests include cultural memory, autobiography and narrative; Australian history; histories of media; historical methodology, especially, oral history, visual representation and material cultures; feminist history; and historiography.

Paul Ashton is Professor of Public History at the University of Technology, Sydney. A member of the Board and Editorial Committee of the Dictionary of Sydney, his most recent publication is Australian History Now (NewSouth) which he edited with Anna Clark.

Endorsements: 
'I found the book to be an absorbing collection that seeks to break away from "I remember when" into new territory involving the use of all the senses, new modes of presentation and media, and novel ways to approach the subject.'
- Professor Peter Read, Department of History, University of Sydney
'Memory comes in many forms. As indeed do suburbs. Rightly, this anthology gathers a range of thematics, tones and literary techniques to honour the variegation of the topics it examines.'
- Professor Ross Gibson, University of Sydney